300-101 ROUTE - EIGRP and OSPF Redistribution and Stub Route

300-101 ROUTE – EIGRP and OSPF Redistribution and Stub Route


Introduction

The use of a routing protocol to advertise routes that are learned by some other means, such as by another routing protocol, static routes, or directly connected routes, is called redistribution. While running a single routing protocol throughout your entire IP internetwork is desirable, multi-protocol routing is common for a number of reasons, such as company mergers, multiple departments managed by multiple network administrators, and multi-vendor environments. Running different routing protocols is often part of a network design. In any case, having a multiple protocol environment makes redistribution a necessity.

Differences in routing protocol characteristics, such as metrics, administrative distance, classful and classless capabilities can effect redistribution. Consideration must be given to these differences for redistribution to succeed.

The OSPF metric is a cost value based on 108/ bandwidth of the link in bits/sec. For example, the OSPF cost of Ethernet is 10: 108/107 = 10

Note: If a metric is not specified, OSPF puts a default value of 20 when redistributing routes from all protocols except Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) routes, which get a metric of 1.

When there is a major net that is subnetted, you need to use the keyword subnet to redistribute protocols into OSPF. Without this keyword, OSPF only redistributes major nets that are not subnetted.

It is possible to run more than one OSPF process on the same router. However, running more than one process of the same protocol is rarely needed, and consumes the router’s memory and CPU.

You do not need to define metric or use the default-metric command when redistributing one OSPF process into another.

A stub network, or pocket network, is a somewhat casual term describing a computer network, or part of an internetwork, with no knowledge of other networks, that will typically send much or all of its non-local traffic out via a single path, with the network aware only of a default route to non-local destinations. As a practical analogy, think of an island which is connected to the rest of the world through a bridge and no other path is available either through air or sea. Continuing this analogy, the island might have more than one physical bridge to the mainland, but the set of bridges still represents only one logical path.

  • An enterprise local area network (LAN) that connects to the corporate network by only one router, or multiple default routers connected to the same logical upstream destination.
  • A single LAN which never carries packets between multiple routers connected to it. All traffic is to and/or from local hosts. The routers will only route packets into the LAN if it’s destined for the LAN, and out from the LAN if it originated on the LAN.

Comments


Books
Nothing here yet!!